Morphing 7 chords with 6 chords

TUESDAY, October 8, 2019

Morphing 7 chords with 6 chords…

The more common, official term for “morphing” is “chromaticism”. It means that instead of using only the 8 notes in any key, which is diatonic, we get to use all 12 possible notes in an octave. This means, for instance, that although a key signature may tell us that we are in the key of C major, no sharps or flats, we are free to use 5 more notes, the ones that are black colored on the piano, the “black keys”. This may get to be a bit confusing, because “black key” also means “black key signatures”, called “black keys” for short. Here I am talking about the 5 black keys in each octave of the piano.

The 7 chords…

Here are the 7 chords that are morphing in each key:

  • Xmaj7
  • X7
  • Xm7
  • Xø and
  • Xº7

The 6 chords…

Mixed in are two 6 chords. Later you will find out that these two 6 chords are inversions of 7 chords

  • X6
  • Xm6
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1 thought on “Morphing 7 chords with 6 chords

  1. “Mixed in are two 6 chords. Later you will find out that these two 6 chords are inversions of 7 chords” To me there is something magical in this – at the same time real, because you demonstrate it at the piano and in notation – but still magical.

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